Coincidence?

Some statistics.

The area chosen for detailed examination was approximately 25 miles east to west and 20 miles north to south, centred upon Guildford in Surrey.

Within this area a list of all prehistoric sites; pre-reformation religious sites; other ancient sites; and sites of possible interest was compiled.  Eighty sites in all were added to a database with their Ordnance Survey coordinates.

Of these sites 22 fell upon the ten degree rays based upon a common base point (Whitmoor Barrow); 16 were in various other alignments; 18 were associated with a common distance of 3600 feet; and 11 of these sites occurred on more than one alignment.

Seven sites had serious relevance problems, being moats and Victorian churches.  These were included as, certainly in the case of victorian churches, a little research may reveal far older origins than one might suspect.  At this time moats must be regarded as coincidental.  The two precise ones have been excavated with no sign of anything pre-medieval.

It may well be that some of this is coincidence but the accuracy of most of this is extraordinary – for example, if the distance value of 3600 feet (Which I have named the Druid Mile) is altered to, say 3650 feet, then the new value cannot be found between any of the 80 sites, nor can any other common distance be found.  This alone is well beyond coincidence.  What does seem to be coincidence is the preciseness of the figure 3600.  It is well known that the english foot was not standardised until the Middle Ages and that the more ancient values varied between times and places so it is difficult to see how this originated.

The alignments radiating from Whitmoor Barrow are extremely precise  – the South Line has the Crooksbury Line at fifty degrees to the west and the Compton Line at thirty degrees to the west.  These are mirrored by the Tyting Line at thirty degrees to the east and the Newlands Line at fifty degrees to the east – again well beyond coincidence.

There are many other ‘coincidences’ described in the text of the alignments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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